Community Forum Archive

Self driving cars

Do you think self driving cars will be available in the next five years? What a life-changer that would be; people with epilepsy being more able to date, get to work more easily, accomplish daily errands, check out new places; leading more independent and less isolating lives. Is it a fantasy, or do you think these cars will really be out in the near future?

Comments

Re: Self driving cars

Submitted by tcameron on Thu, 2013-11-14 - 19:58

Its a reality, but unfortunately not allowed for anyone yet.  Hopefully, this will be a reality for us as soon as some of the issues are resolved:  The legalities haven't been worked out.  A blind person couldn't stop in case of an accident.  However, its even more dangerous for us w/ uncontrolled seizures.  I just saw a video of a blind man in a self-driving car. 

The differences between being blind and having a seizure while driving are enormous.  A blind person doesn't lose conciousness w/out being aware of going to sleep.  A self-driving car could get you to your destination, provided no one plows into you. 

If you have a seizure while in the car, you'll still go through your postically confused state.  You won't be aware of your seizure.  You could open the door, and immediately fall onto the ground/driveway/parking lot.  You could get out leaving your keys/purse/other valuables inside.  You could even walk into traffic, in front of other cars, or be completley fine and wonder, "where in the world am I?" when you return "back to earth".

You're extremely vulnerable while postictally confused. Someone could take advantage of you.  They could tell you to give them your keys and you might obey.  (Usually, a person who just experienced a seizure will follow instructions when given by someone in a calm, assuring voice.) I know that for a fact because my neighbors have found me in my apartment complex.  I follow instructions, give them my keys. They've led me upstairs to my apartment and left in front of my computer, only to learn about it later when a neighbor tells me.  

Self-driving cars are still too dangerous for us w/ uncontrolled seizures.  Perhaps one of these days, it will be a reality for all of us.  Wouldn't that be great?

Its a reality, but unfortunately not allowed for anyone yet.  Hopefully, this will be a reality for us as soon as some of the issues are resolved:  The legalities haven't been worked out.  A blind person couldn't stop in case of an accident.  However, its even more dangerous for us w/ uncontrolled seizures.  I just saw a video of a blind man in a self-driving car. 

The differences between being blind and having a seizure while driving are enormous.  A blind person doesn't lose conciousness w/out being aware of going to sleep.  A self-driving car could get you to your destination, provided no one plows into you. 

If you have a seizure while in the car, you'll still go through your postically confused state.  You won't be aware of your seizure.  You could open the door, and immediately fall onto the ground/driveway/parking lot.  You could get out leaving your keys/purse/other valuables inside.  You could even walk into traffic, in front of other cars, or be completley fine and wonder, "where in the world am I?" when you return "back to earth".

You're extremely vulnerable while postictally confused. Someone could take advantage of you.  They could tell you to give them your keys and you might obey.  (Usually, a person who just experienced a seizure will follow instructions when given by someone in a calm, assuring voice.) I know that for a fact because my neighbors have found me in my apartment complex.  I follow instructions, give them my keys. They've led me upstairs to my apartment and left in front of my computer, only to learn about it later when a neighbor tells me.  

Self-driving cars are still too dangerous for us w/ uncontrolled seizures.  Perhaps one of these days, it will be a reality for all of us.  Wouldn't that be great?

Such a person would have

Submitted by gauthier.russel@gmail.com on Sat, 2015-08-15 - 14:47
Such a person would have difficulty taking even the bus, as they would do the same things. 

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